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Eryngium creticum

Eryngium creticum

Eryngium creticum, or Crete eryngo, is native to southeast Europe, western Asia and Egypt. This photograph is from mid-August in the E.H. Lohbrunner Alpine Garden.

9 Comments

Simple and yet so beautiful.

Nice shot, love the blue and yellow colours.

Great plant and wonderful photo!

Absolutely beautiful photo! Lovely to see on a cold, windy, snowy day in Chilliwack! Reminds me that summer, hopefully, can't be too far away!!!

google book search
the universal botanist and nursery man
richard weston pp 303 year 1770
a nice digital copy
crete eryngo gave me better links

i hope the colder months will be
kind to your gardens thank you

I love the prickly textural Eryngium in focus, contrasted with the soft, out of focus yellow background plant. Great composition!

Many thanks for your very beautiful photos !!
crete eryngio is a nice digital photo.

The plant in the foreground (not background) looks like a monocot such as a Gladiolus. What is it? The shot is similar to taking photos of animals at the zoo through the fence. The focus allows most if not all of the fence to
"disappear" while focusing on the animal. This Eryngium creticum is lovely. I believe it can be dried for floral arrangement and still retain most of its blue color.

Dianne

This photo shows perfectly how lighting and composition can make simple subject matter into beuty. (and, of course, the skilled photographer who can put those elements together is needed) I can always visit your site to absorb the beauty of nature into my soul.
Carol

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