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Bryoria fuscescens

Bryoria fuscescens

Apologies for the late entries recently – I'm finishing up a big project (that you'll get to see at the end of January or so) and all that goes with that, so opportunities for rest are taken when I can get them.

I'm fairly certain of the identity of this lichen, though it could be another species in the genus. If it is Bryoria fuscescens, its common name is speckled horsehair lichen or pale-footed horsehair lichen. The epithet fuscescens means “becoming dark”. The related Bryoria fremontii is regarded as “the most widely used edible lichen in North America” (see edible horsehair at the Lichens of North America site).

Bryoria fuscescens is widely distributed across North America and Europe, particularly in association with montane and boreal forests. It is commonly found on conifers.

5 Comments

Daniel, sounds interesting ............any recipes ?

Ahh, yes, I've seen this. Bryoria. Edible? Hmmm. Nice photo :-)

Beautiful colours. Could form the basis of a trendy decorating scheme. Thanks, Daniel!

i am not sure about edible horsehair
my tastes run amock when i see a wild
starbucks and a moca fudge ice cold latte
they have no problems reproduceing

wait till january we will just have to
do you have a holiday tree in the park
and may we please see it thank you daniel

Actually I do have a recipe. Working with the Kamloops Band a few years ago, the elders showed us how to make this 'dessert'. Layers of 'horsehair' and saskatoon berries were put in a pit and cooked for 24 hours. The result was very edible!

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